Breadcrumbs

Home > Be Prepared

Prepare for Winter

Winter Storms, Blizzards and Nor’easters (Oh My!)

How do Winter Storms Form?
According to weatherquestions.com, winter storms form within a low-pressure front. When rising damp air combines with warm air moving over cold air, it creates rain or snow. When the air is mostly cold, snow will fall instead of rain. Strong winds can develop stronger storms and lead to blizzard conditions. Blizzards are a step up from a small winter storms for the high winds, low visibility, and how long they can last. A snow storm is considered a blizzard when the winds reach more than 35 mph, visibility is reduced to a quarter mile (or less), and when the storm lasts more than 3 hours. Blizzards do not have to be producing snow to be a blizzard. Blowing snow can contribute to low visibility.

Unfortunately the National Weather Service does not name winter storms because they tend to disappear and reform. However, the Weather Channel attempted a marketing ploy to name nor'easters. One particular storm they named "Winter Storm Quinn." Social media took it in stride, of course.

So What is a Nor’easter?
Nor’easter (Aka. Northeaster) is a very large winter storm. They develop in response to warm southern Gulf winds and cold air descending from Canada. They tend to form the most devastating storms between October and March.
 
Winter Safety: What Do I Need to Know?
Severe winter storms can cause all kinds of danger. Low visibility, frostbite, hypothermia, loss of electricity and risk of elderly and young children’s health contribute to the dangers of winter.
Winter

Preparing for and learning about winter safety may prepare you for a bad day. Knowing what keeps you safe may help others too. Keep yourself safe from a winter power outage with a home standby generator. When utility power stops, your generator picks up where utility left off. Invite neighbors over for a warm place to stay.

Here’s a few things ready.gov recommends to prepare for winter:

  1. Prepare an emergency kit of food, water, any pet food, radio, flashlight, warm clothes and blankets
  2. Know your area’s risk of snowstorms
  3. Pay attention to weather reports
  4. Prepare your home for winter cold by installing insulation, caulk, and weather stripping.
  5. Create an emergency kit for your car
    • Jumper cables
    • Extra gas
    • Sand
    • Flashlight (with extra batteries)
    • Warm clothes and blankets
    • Non-perishable food and bottled water
  6. Learn the signs of hypothermia and frostbite and know how to treat them.

Preparing for and learning about winter safety may prepare you for a bad day. Knowing what keeps you safe may help others too. Keep yourself safe from a winter power outage with a home standby generator. When utility power stops, your generator picks up where utility left off. Invite neighbors over for a warm place to stay.

Winter Power you can Depend on

Protect your family and friends from hypothermia and frostbite if utility power fails. Stay warm this winter with a home standby generator.