Natural Gas Resources

A Case for Natural Gas Back-up; Addressing the Life Safety Building Codes
NFPA 110 is the standard for backup generator systems, categorized under Emergency and Standby Power Systems. This article addresses the requirements for generator testing contained in the NFPA 110 standard and explains why using natural gas to power emergency backup generators instead of diesel is an advantage in some cases. Read more »

Codes & Standards

CODE COMPLIANCE - Despite their use of utility-supplied natural gas, Generac Bi-Fuel generators meet the on-site fuel requirements for emergency systems as referenced in NEC700 and NFPA 110. With less diesel fuel required to be stored on-site, permitting also becomes easier. And indoor fuel installations with capacity limits per NFPA or local codes become a viable option.
NFPA 20

NFPA 20

Fire Pumps
NFPA 30

NFPA 30

Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code
NFPA 37

NFPA 37

Standard for the Installation and Use of Stationary Combustion Engines and Gas Turbines
NFPA 54

NFPA 54

National Fuel Gas Code
NFPA 58

NFPA 58

Liquefied Petroleum Gas Code
NFPA 70

NFPA 70

National Electrical Code
NFPA 99

NFPA 99

Health Care Facilities Code
NFPA 101

NFPA 101

Life Safety Code
NFPA 110

NFPA 110

Standard for Emergency and Standby Power Systems
UL 142

UL 142

Steel Aboveground Tanks for Flammable and Combustible Liquids
UL 891

UL 891

Dead-Front Switchboard
UL 1008

UL 1008

Transfer Switches
UL 1558

UL 1558

Metal-Enclosed Low-Voltage Power Circuit Breaker Switchgear
UL 2085

UL 2085

Protected Aboveground Tanks for Flammable and Combustible Liquids
UL 2200

UL 2200

Stationary Engine Generator Assemblies
ISO 3046-1

ISO 3046-1

Reciprocating internal combustion engines -- Performance -- Part 1: Declarations of power, fuel and lubricating oil consumptions, and test methods -- Additional requirements for engines for general use
ISO 8528-5

ISO 8528-5

Reciprocating internal combustion engine driven alternating current generating sets -- Part 5: Generating sets

Natural Gas Whitepapers

Gaseous Fuel Genset Solutions Becoming More Affordable, Greener
Traditionally, the choice between diesel-fueled and gaseous-fueled generators has been relatively straightforward. Power density as well as capital cost advantages in large-kilowatt applications typically favored diesel for standby power of 150 kilowatts of electricity (kWE) or more—large commercial and industrial standby applications.

Reliability Assessment of Diesel vs. Natural Gas for Standby Generation (GTI)
In the past, gaseous fuels were avoided in emergency power or standby power supply (EPSS) applications greater than 150kW based upon cost effectiveness, power density, and perceptions of durability and fuel reliability. Recently, cost-effective natural gas engines that are environmentally friendly and can sustain long run times have been developed and are now common in the market.

Understanding Natural Gas Fuel Reliability for Backup Power
Reliability of fuel supply tends to be of great concern for authorities having jurisdiction (AHJs). On-site fuel (most often diesel) is typically required for life-safety applications, and many mission-critical applications like 911 call centers specify it because it is perceived to be more reliable.

Sizing Considerations for Commercial and Industrial Generators
Sizing a generator for industrial applications involves a variety of factors that can influence the specification and purchasing process. To ensure the optimal power solution for your application, it is highly recommended that you work with your local generator representative to ensure accurate sizing for your project.
Standby Power Generation Fuel Security – Diesel vs. Natural Gas
As natural gas continues to gain market share over diesel fuel for emergency power system (EPS) applications, those who once perceived the security and reliability of onsite diesel fuel have started to question the maintenance requirements and operational risks associated with maintaining a consistent and dependable diesel fuel supply.

Total Cost of Ownership Diesel vs. Natural Gas Generators
The standby power market has historically been dominated by diesel generators, but this is changing. Frost & Sullivan North American market research data shows a rapid shift toward natural gas generators: 28 percent in 2013 and 38 percent in 2016.

Unlocking the Potential of Demand Response
Demand response is an economic signal to reduce power consumption of an electric utility customer to better match the available supply of electricity. Electric energy cannot be easily stored, so utilities have traditionally matched demand and supply by throttling the output of their power plants, taking generating units on or off line, or importing power from other utilities.

Permitting Considerations for Natural Gas Generator Solutions
A commercial or industrial generator is a large investment that not only requires service and routine maintenance but also takes up valuable real estate. During the generator sizing process, there are several factors to consider regarding permitting and application requirements as they apply to the needs of the end user and local code demands.